2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • THREE COLORS: RED
    1:10 5:20 9:30
    CONFIDENTIALLY YOURS
    3:10

Tickets available at box office only

Part of the seriesTRINTIGNANT

See the complete schedule of films

THREE COLORS: RED and CONFIDENTIALLY YOURS

THREE COLORS: RED

(1994, Krzysztof Kieslowski) “I want nothing!” barks retired judge JLT when Irene Jacob returns his injured dog, but then he spends his time eavesdropping on wiretapped conversations, while she talks to a boyfriend on the phone whom she seemingly never sees — and will she meet the law student who lives across the way? Approx. 99 min. 35mm.
1:10, 5:20, 9:30

 

“A beautifully spun and splendidly acted tale… Trintignant is fascinating as a man who, in mulling over the verdicts of a lifetime and comparing the rigor of a courtroom with the messy and intricate conversations on which he eavesdrops, recalibrates his moral compass.” 
– Lisa Nesselson, Variety

“A deeply affecting cascade of romantic fate and suffering, of karma and multiple irony. It’s also beautifully flush with extraordinary compositions in red by cameraman Piotr Sobocinski and set designer Claude Lenoir. As for the performances, they couldn’t be better. Trintignant is magnificent as the spiritually transformed judge.”
– Desson Howe, The Washington Post

THREE COLORS: RED and CONFIDENTIALLY YOURS

CONFIDENTIALLY YOURS

(1983, François Truffaut) Accused of the murder of his wife and her lover, real estate man Trintignant holes up in a basement apartment while his ever-loving secretary Fanny Ardant sets out to crack the case. Truffaut’s swan song was shot in 40s-style b&w by Nestor Almendros. Approx. 110 min. 35mm.
SUN 3:10, 7:20 MON 3:10

 

"The suave manners and stiff formalities of the bourgeoisie, petite and grande, in a cozy Provençal city seethe with erotic frenzy in François Truffaut’s final film, evoking the spontaneous sexual spectacle of city life. He doubles down cinephilically with a reprise of the famous false kiss from Hitchcock’s Notorious and a citation from the romantic roundelay of Renoir’s Rules of the Game, and recalls his own Day for Night in depicting shared work as the ultimate aphrodisiac. Filmed by Nestor Almendros in warm and silky black-and-white."
– Richary Brody, The New Yorker